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20121202
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possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's ground hog day. the question who is playing bill murray? i mean such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines, and, so, you know, where th
type of constitution in which the people can have a say in electing their government. and where the countries then are put on a more stable footing. because once that goes, then what? so this is fantastically difficult. once you lift the lid off these very repressive regimes and out comes all this religious and tribal tension, we have to find a way to stabilizing the situation and bring the bloodshed to an end. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding t
. >> in a few days after the election when republicans vote didn't have the president has been disbanded voters like a 44-point gap. right away they said we need to do something aggressive on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans already couldn't agree on what needs to be done. how do you get your own party on the same page, devout democrats? >> i disagree. i don't think that's it's happening. what happens is the concept of immigration reform is one of consensus on the details of immigration reform with every major piece of legislation. we have millions of people who come here illegally. a lot of them come to me and say we've done it the right way and we didn't pay the fees, the churchgoing may somehow affecting the legally legally it would have been faster? it didn't seem right, so people are troubled by it. that's one example of one debate we will have. there's going to be invited to bid in the democratic party. as labor unions i'm in favor of a guestworker program. they will have an internal party debates. there's no magic solution. it's important to do and i believe we can.
and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail or in the streets in opposition for their entire careers. they come into office. why would we think that they spent all their time out of office reading the federalists papers in arabic translations? they didn't. the only political game they know how to play is the old play. >> get power. >> seize it. in this case, the
, where election timing may spell budget delays. we have the story from tokyo. >> the election campaign has officially kicked off in japan, but there are worries the budget is not likely to be ready pi the end of this year. they will likely call a special session to elect a new prime minister, then select a cabinet before moving on to budget matters. once they reconvene in january, the new government would likely pass the supplementary budget first before submitting its fiscal 2013 plan in february. so a senior lawmaker predicts that the fiscal 2013 budget will not actually pass until mid may. that's more than a month into the new fiscal year. and if the government can't get the job done by the end of march, a provisional budget will be needed. opinion polls show the gap between the ldp and the ruling democratic party has been narrowing. that means if the ldp can't get their majority, these bills could be delayed even more. back to you, ross. >> all right, thanks for that. that's the late fres the nikkei. still to come, the business of entertainment in asia, it's big. going to get even
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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